The Saint vs. the Scholar: The Fight between Faith and Reason

published by Franciscan Media | Hardback - With dust jacket | 192 pages
$ 21.99
Set between the violence of the Crusades and the threat of the Inquisition is a forgotten episode in history: the fight between Bernard of Clairvaux (the saint and “doctor of the church”) and Peter Abelard (the scholar). This popular history shows how what happened between two extraordinary men face-to-face in a contest of wills long ago is a key to understanding who we are today as people of faith. This intense, emotional, partisan clash between two men, the method by which the saint wins the battle, and the ways in which the scholar provokes the saint’s outrage, changed the course of history as well as framed the conflict between reason and faith that exists day. 

Stock #: B36967

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Customer Reviews

Based on 5 reviews
60%
(3)
40%
(2)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
B
B.B.
Into medieval history and Church philosophy? Get this book

The book arrived as promised. I haven't finished reading it. But for any who likes medieval Church history, and learning about how the views the Church has held has changed pertaining to philosophy; I recommend it. I am enjoying it immensely.

M
M.S.
Worth reading.

A very informative and captivating read.

H
H.M.
The Saint vs. The Scholar

Have started Hermann Hesses;s Narcissus and Goldmand. Saint Hildegard Von Bingen is still my favorite

D
D.
Saints vs Scholar

Most enjoyable. I had no idea the faith vs reason arguments went back so far in church history and that they got so violent.

J
J.B.
Saint and Scholar

Reminded me so much of the harm and division we all can cause each other by being so immovable or intractable. (Similar story would be Cardinal Humbert, legate of Pope Leo I who in many ways caused the 1054 East-West Schism, or even the inevitable martyrdom of Joan of Arc). I thought it was a great read, really touched on the personalities, their perspectives, but also the times they were living.
Some of the politics (yep both religious and state) and religious perspectives may be a little deep for some (as to why they would get bogged down or put the book down), but otherwise it was not something for most of us to schlogg through, but really entertaining.

Jon M. Sweeney is an independent scholar and one of religion’s most respected writers. His work has been hailed by everyone from Booklist and James Martin, S.J. to Fox News and Dan Savage. He’s been interviewed on CBS Saturday Morning, Fox News, and other television programs. His books have sold more than 225,000 copies worldwide; some have been History Book Club, Book-of-the-Month Club, and Quality Paperback Book Club selections. The Pope Who Quit: A True Medieval Tale of Mystery, Death, and Salvation, was published by Image/Random House and optioned by HBO. He is also the author of Inventing Hell, and several books about Francis of Assisi including When Saint Francis Saved the Church and The Enthusiast.
 

Product Type:  Book

Item Number:  #B36967

ISBN:  9781616369675

BISAC: 

Imprint:  Franciscan Media

Trim Size:  139.7 mm X 215.9 mm X
(Approx. 5.5 in X 8.5 in X )

Pages:  192

List Price:  $ 21.99

Customer Reviews

Based on 5 reviews
60%
(3)
40%
(2)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
B
B.B.
Into medieval history and Church philosophy? Get this book

The book arrived as promised. I haven't finished reading it. But for any who likes medieval Church history, and learning about how the views the Church has held has changed pertaining to philosophy; I recommend it. I am enjoying it immensely.

M
M.S.
Worth reading.

A very informative and captivating read.

H
H.M.
The Saint vs. The Scholar

Have started Hermann Hesses;s Narcissus and Goldmand. Saint Hildegard Von Bingen is still my favorite

D
D.
Saints vs Scholar

Most enjoyable. I had no idea the faith vs reason arguments went back so far in church history and that they got so violent.

J
J.B.
Saint and Scholar

Reminded me so much of the harm and division we all can cause each other by being so immovable or intractable. (Similar story would be Cardinal Humbert, legate of Pope Leo I who in many ways caused the 1054 East-West Schism, or even the inevitable martyrdom of Joan of Arc). I thought it was a great read, really touched on the personalities, their perspectives, but also the times they were living.
Some of the politics (yep both religious and state) and religious perspectives may be a little deep for some (as to why they would get bogged down or put the book down), but otherwise it was not something for most of us to schlogg through, but really entertaining.